Thursday 28 February 2019

Smart cities : platforms for liveable cities – Talk by Paul Budde

Cities around the world are growing exponentially. Cities are where the current global problems are coming together: climate change, energy supply, sustainability, migration, refugees, economic transformations. Rather than operating in silos, cities should take a holistic approach using their services and infrastructure as a platform from where to address issues such as: circular economy (waste, water, energy); the digital economy (communication, interconnection) ; mobility (transport); wellbeing, liveability, entertainment; future capacity building (new jobs, education, R&D, innovation, start-ups, new tax revenue).

New digital technologies (smarts) are the enabling tools in these transformations. Building smart cities requires leadership from mayors and city CEOs and collaboration between all three levels of government, private industry and the research and development community. Once that is in place smart cities should be developed together with the citizens and the local communities.

Paul Budde is the CEO of Paul Budde Consulting, which specialises in strategic planning of government and business innovation and transformation around the digital, sharing and interconnected economy, resulting in the building of smart cities and smart communities. He advised the Minister for Broadband in Australia on strategy and policy developments of the original NBN. He has been an adviser in discussions on the national interest concept of smart infrastructure in the White House, the FCC, United Nations and governments of the Netherlands, Australia, Britain, Qatar, Ireland and New Zealand.

He is a director of the Global Smart City and Community Coalition (GSC3), an advisor to the Australian Smart Communities Association, founder of Smart Grid Australia and a founding board member of the Global Smart Grid Federation. In 2016 he organised the Dutch Australian Smart City Summit and in 2017 was awarded the prestigious Charles Todd Medal for services to the telecommunications industry.

Venue: History House, 133 Macquarie Street, Sydney
Time: 5.30 for 6 pm
Cost: includes light refreshments on arrival; RAHS and ASHET members $10, others $12
Bookings: phone RAHS on (02) 9247 8001, email history@rahs.org.au

Paul Budde

Thursday 21 March 2019

Technology and Engineering at the Grass Roots: 180 Years of the Development of Wire Strainers – Talk by John Pickard

Wire strainers are more than just simple farm tools. They must combine several elements: a grip to hold the wire being tensioned, a mechanism to pull the wire up to the required tension, and some way of holding the wire while it is joined or tied off. And as the technology of wire changed from iron to steel and then high tensile steel, inventors patented their solution to the problems of straining fences. This talk, illustrated with both images and a range of historical strainers, outlines the history of the technology and engineering of strainers.

Dr John Pickard has studied rural fences since the early 1990s, and has published numerous papers on the history of fencing, and its precursor, shepherding, culminating in a PhD in 2010. He is currently revising his 2009 “Illustrated glossary of Australian rural fences” which has morphed into an “Encyclopaedia of Australian rural fences”.

Venue: History House, 133 Macquarie Street, Sydney
Time: 5.30 for 6 pm
Cost: includes light refreshments on arrival; RAHS and ASHET members $10, others $12
Bookings: phone RAHS on (02) 9247 8001, email history@rahs.org.au

wire strainer

Thomas’ Success Wire Strainer patented by Isaac Roderick Thomas (blacksmith) in 1896. Museum Victoria, Jack Chisholm Fencing Collection ST45268. Image copyright © John Pickard.